Ho‘ohana Aloha

Tumblr usefulness for Rosa Say which you’re welcome to get in on: Finds I’m reading, learning, and weaving into an ‘Imi ola life, with a good measure tracking my gardening hobby. For less: Follow @rosasay on Twitter or @rsay on Instagram. For more: Visit my blog continuing the conversations of Managing with Aloha.

Apr 18
The rabbit’s foot fern has found its happy place beneath the calamansi tree. (at In the garden)

The rabbit’s foot fern has found its happy place beneath the calamansi tree. (at In the garden)



humansofnewyork:

"You should kiss the ground you walk on if you were born in this country— take it from an old man who once had to wear the Star of David on his shirt. There’s a safety to living in such a diverse place. It’s much more difficult to brainwash a population that is composed of so many different nationalities and so many different viewpoints."

This is Living with Aloha ~ it is testament to the value of Kākou, inclusiveness, and its community connectiveness, the value of ‘Ohana.

humansofnewyork:

"You should kiss the ground you walk on if you were born in this country— take it from an old man who once had to wear the Star of David on his shirt. There’s a safety to living in such a diverse place. It’s much more difficult to brainwash a population that is composed of so many different nationalities and so many different viewpoints."

This is Living with Aloha ~ it is testament to the value of Kākou, inclusiveness, and its community connectiveness, the value of ‘Ohana.


thisbigcity:

soundbitecity:

No Surface Without a Seat

Berlin isn’t the warmest of places, so I was continually surprised by the amount of outdoor seating around the city.  In some neighborhoods, sidewalk cafes, public benches, beer gardens, or terraces seemed to be at every turn.  But what surprised me even more than the sheer amount of seating, was the seemingly ad-hoc, improvised, or innovative nature of many of the options.  Anywhere there was a surface or some extra space, you were bound to find a cushion, a folding chair, a crate, or some recycled materials inviting you to sit down and take a break.  It wasn’t limited to restaurants and bars either - cushions and chairs could be found on the steps, ledges, sidewalks, and street corners outside of clothing stores, gift shops, and all sorts of other random places.

My visit was in April, presumably the time of year when these chairs and cushions first emerge from winter storage.  I’d be curious to take walk through the city in summertime to see them in greater use, and to see if even more sprout up.  It must create an impressively vibrant street life.

Photos taken April, 2014

Take a seat!

Love this, for I have often lamented the lack of places people can sit and converse within workplaces, and at our local businesses. The very appearance of open seating is a warm and welcoming invitation. Way to go Berlin!

(via npr)


Apr 17

I am trying to identify this aloe; anyone familiar with it? Very thick and fleshy, bumpy texture, with shades of dark greens. It is interesting in the way it will start a pup in the intersections of the blooms stems, but I have yet to root any of them successfully. Not that much of a concern though, for it produces a lot of pups at its base as well.


Veggie hearts in the pallet bed. Moving a lot of pots and seedling trays this morning to be in reach of the sprinkler system. Will be traveling for a few days. My only worry is if the winds return… I need a greenhouse!
Pictured: Spinach, rhubarb, sorrel, red lettuce, squash, arugula, cilantro, banana pepper, leeks.
(at In the garden)

Veggie hearts in the pallet bed. Moving a lot of pots and seedling trays this morning to be in reach of the sprinkler system. Will be traveling for a few days. My only worry is if the winds return… I need a greenhouse!

Pictured: Spinach, rhubarb, sorrel, red lettuce, squash, arugula, cilantro, banana pepper, leeks.

(at In the garden)


Apr 16

The German Chamomile is blooming, spared by the winds :)  (at In the garden)

The German Chamomile is blooming, spared by the winds :) 
(at In the garden)



unconsumption:


Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.
Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.
He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

Also:

It’s clear that he cares deeply about his creations. He talks of “falling in love” with some of the things he finds, of showing materials “respect” and of giving pieces the “attention they deserve”. He speaks softly from under a sweep of silky hair and with the gentlest murmur of a West Country accent, all of which adds to the romance of his endeavours. “I’m not setting out to save the world,” he says. “I just think there is a better, calmer way to do things and that people should design responsibly.”

unconsumption:

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.

Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.

He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

Also:

It’s clear that he cares deeply about his creations. He talks of “falling in love” with some of the things he finds, of showing materials “respect” and of giving pieces the “attention they deserve”. He speaks softly from under a sweep of silky hair and with the gentlest murmur of a West Country accent, all of which adds to the romance of his endeavours. “I’m not setting out to save the world,” he says. “I just think there is a better, calmer way to do things and that people should design responsibly.”


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