Ho‘ohana Aloha

Tumblr usefulness for Rosa Say which you’re welcome to get in on: Finds I’m reading, learning, and weaving into an ‘Imi ola life, with a good measure tracking my gardening hobby. For less: Follow @rosasay on Twitter or @rsay on Instagram. For more: Visit my blog continuing the conversations of Managing with Aloha.

Posts tagged creativity

Aug 31
“Learning is not passive. It’s insanely active.” 12 Secrets for Unlocking Your Most Creative Work | Chase Jarvis Blog

Apr 15

A few more photos to appreciate a new pot of stripey pink dahlia… (the 1st one was here.) I’m taking this advice to boost my creativity by surrounding myself with beautiful things :) Alisa Burke: Finding Inspiration ~

It’s also a Managing with Aloha values exercise in the practice of Mahalo:

Mahalo. Thank you, as a way of living.
With Mahalo, we give thanks for every element that enriches our lives by living in thankfulness for them. We relish them. We celebrate them joyously. Mahalo is the value that gives us an attitude of gratitude, and the pleasure of awe and wonder.


Dec 27

The key to being creative, in any field, be it scientific, technical, or business, in the 21st century definitely requires a certain comfort level in technology. But the best way to harness the power of computers doesn’t reside in coding – it resides in letting computers do the grunt computational work that humans are bad at, so that humans can focus on the creative, problem solving work that computers are bad at.

And if you want to foster those creative, problem solving skills, the solution isn’t learning to code – it’s learning to paint. Or play an instrument. Or write poetry. Or sculpt. The field doesn’t matter: the key thing is that if you want to foster your own innovative creativity, the best way to do it is to seriously pursue an artistic endeavor.

In the history of the Nobel Prize, nearly every Laureate has pursued the arts. According to research by psychologists Michele and Robert Root-Bernstein, “almost all Nobel laureates in the sciences actively engage in arts as adults. They are twenty-five times as likely as the average scientist to sing, dance, or act; seventeen times as likely to be a visual artist; twelve times more likely to write poetry and literature; eight times more likely to do woodworking or some other craft; four times as likely to be a musician; and twice as likely to be a photographer.”

To Foster Your Creativity, Don’t Learn To Code; Learn To Paint - Forbes (via ayjay)

(via ayjay)


Dec 6

Nov 9
“Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations. Architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable. Originality is non-existent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery—celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said, ‘It’s not where you take things from. It’s where you take them to.’” Jim Jarmusch (via kadrey)

(via emergentfutures)


Oct 21
“If I dismiss the ordinary — waiting for the special, the extreme, the extraordinary to happen — I may just miss my life. […] To allow ourselves to spend afternoons watching dancers rehearse, or sit on a stone wall and watch the sunset, or spend the whole weekend rereading Chekhov stories—to know that we are doing what we’re supposed to be doing — is the deepest form of permission in our creative lives. The British author and psychologist Adam Phillips has noted, “When we are inspired, rather like when we are in love, we can feel both unintelligible to ourselves and most truly ourselves.” This is the feeling I think we all yearn for, a kind of hyperreal dream state. We read Emily Dickinson. We watch the dancers. We research a little known piece of history obsessively. We fall in love. We don’t know why, and yet these moments form the source from which all our words will spring.” Read this, your soul will thank you (via explore-blog)

(via creativesomething)


May 26
austinkleon:

For a while, it seemed like I was getting sent this article, “Creative People Say No” at least twice a day. The idea is that creative geniuses say “no” to a lot of requests (like, a psychology professor researching processes of creative genius) in order to get their work done, so if you want to be a creative genius, you have to say no a lot so you can get your work done.
A bunch of people asked me what I thought about it, and I said, “It’s good advice for the rich and famous.”
Ian Bogost explains it nicely, here:

[Y]ou have to say ‘yes’ for a long while before you can earn the right to say ‘no.’ Even then, you usually can’t say ‘no’ at whim. By the time you can say ‘no’ indiscriminately, then you’re already so super-privileged that being able to say ‘no’ is not a prerequisite of success, but a result of it.

There was a little index card in the back of Steal Like An Artist that didn’t make it into the book that sums up my own point of view: “Be as generous as you can, but selfish enough to get your work done.”
(Thx @ayjay.)

I like the way he sums it up: “Be as generous as you can, but selfish enough to get your work done.” …the sweet spot of Aloha, Lokomaika‘i (the generosity of good heart) ‘Ike loa (learning from others along the way) and Ho‘ohana (the worthwhile work you are dedicated to).
[All are listed at The 19 Values of Aloha. Check out ‘Imi ola and Nānā i ke kumu for more thoughts on creativity. ]

austinkleon:

For a while, it seemed like I was getting sent this article, “Creative People Say No” at least twice a day. The idea is that creative geniuses say “no” to a lot of requests (like, a psychology professor researching processes of creative genius) in order to get their work done, so if you want to be a creative genius, you have to say no a lot so you can get your work done.

A bunch of people asked me what I thought about it, and I said, “It’s good advice for the rich and famous.”

Ian Bogost explains it nicely, here:

[Y]ou have to say ‘yes’ for a long while before you can earn the right to say ‘no.’ Even then, you usually can’t say ‘no’ at whim. By the time you can say ‘no’ indiscriminately, then you’re already so super-privileged that being able to say ‘no’ is not a prerequisite of success, but a result of it.

There was a little index card in the back of Steal Like An Artist that didn’t make it into the book that sums up my own point of view: “Be as generous as you can, but selfish enough to get your work done.”

(Thx @ayjay.)

I like the way he sums it up: “Be as generous as you can, but selfish enough to get your work done.” …the sweet spot of Aloha, Lokomaika‘i (the generosity of good heart) ‘Ike loa (learning from others along the way) and Ho‘ohana (the worthwhile work you are dedicated to).

[All are listed at The 19 Values of Aloha. Check out ‘Imi ola and Nānā i ke kumu for more thoughts on creativity. ]


Mar 4

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