Ho‘ohana Aloha

Tumblr usefulness for Rosa Say which you’re welcome to get in on: Finds I’m reading, learning, and weaving into an ‘Imi ola life, with a good measure tracking my gardening hobby. For less: Follow @rosasay on Twitter or @rsay on Instagram. For more: Visit my blog continuing the conversations of Managing with Aloha.

Posts tagged reading

Sep 11

lemonysnicketlibrary:

"Keep anyone with whom you can read in silence."
—Lemony Snicket


Counterpoint to this one.

lemonysnicketlibrary:

"Keep anyone with whom you can read in silence."

Lemony Snicket

Counterpoint to this one.

(via powells)


Sep 8
thetinhouse:

Kurt always says it best.

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.


Reading some fiction now, am about halfway through the novel, and it’s interesting to reflect on how the author follows these rules, or doesn’t.

thetinhouse:

Kurt always says it best.

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

Reading some fiction now, am about halfway through the novel, and it’s interesting to reflect on how the author follows these rules, or doesn’t.

(via powells)


Sep 1

hotelsociety:

The world’s coolest mobile bookstore. It’s a 1975 Renault Estafette in case you were wondering. Fantastic. 

You know you want one… I sure do! The link above goes to a good NPR article.

Somewhat related, I’ve discovered that RV-living is illegal throughout Hawaii; no trailer parks here. Seriously bummed… there go my nomadic bohemian dreams.


Aug 1
wordpainting:

So true!

I love this image.

wordpainting:

So true!

I love this image.

(via workmanpublishing)


Jul 21

fastcompany:

Kids Need A Flashlight To Read This Adorable Pop-up Book

Motion Silhouette tells a story through its shadows.

Reading by flashlight when you’re supposed to be asleep is practically a rite of passage for kids. An adorable new children’s book celebrates that tradition.

Read More>

So brilliant.


May 16
Note to self: look up this book.

Note to self: look up this book.


Mar 26
“Reading is everything. Reading makes me feel like I’ve accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. Reading makes me smarter. Reading gives me something to talk about later on. Reading is the unbelievably healthy way my attention deficit disorder medicates itself. Reading is escape, and the opposite of escape; it’s a way to make contact with reality after a day of making things up, and it’s a way of making contact with someone else’s imagination after a day that’s all too real. Reading is grist. Reading is bliss.” Nora Ephron (via pointsofcreativity)

(via adamkayce)


Mar 14
unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 
I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!
This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.
(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock)

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 

I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!

This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.

(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock)


Jan 16
“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.”

Albert Einstein (via labelleleigh)

And if you want to be a more intelligent (and more interesting) adult, read fairy tales (just finished, and loved this one :)

(via darkryemag)


Jan 11

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