Ho‘ohana Aloha

Tumblr usefulness for Rosa Say which you’re welcome to get in on: Finds I’m reading, learning, and weaving into an ‘Imi ola life, with a good measure tracking my gardening hobby. For less: Follow @rosasay on Twitter or @rsay on Instagram. For more: Visit my blog continuing the conversations of Managing with Aloha.

Posts tagged writing

Jul 21
“Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.” Rudyard Kipling (via fourteendrawings)

(via fourteendrawings)


Jul 13
“Once you’ve mastered a particular language, you’ve also mastered a means of thinking. You understand how to decompose a problem into knowable units, and you learn how to intertwine those units into pleasant and functional flow. Perhaps you’ve figured out how to get that flow to perform at Herculean scale. There is no doubt in my mind that this is an essential and valuable skill for anyone to learn and master. However, there is a language you could master that teaches many of the same lessons, appears far more forgiving in terms of syntax, and has immediate broader appeal. The language you can learn is your own.” Please Learn to Write – Rands in Repose

Mar 26
algonquinyoungreaders:

Kids, Kate Klise shares her Top Ten Tips for Becoming a Bestselling Writer. (These tips work for grownups, too!)

algonquinyoungreaders:

Kids, Kate Klise shares her Top Ten Tips for Becoming a Bestselling Writer. (These tips work for grownups, too!)

(via workmanpublishing)


explore-blog:

Annie Dillard on the art of the essay – a fantastic read for all, but especially for writers. 

explore-blog:

Annie Dillard on the art of the essay – a fantastic read for all, but especially for writers. 


Dec 22
“Something that also taught me how to write that I tell people — I’ve never been a writing teacher, but I say it because it was so helpful to me when I started doing it – is to buy a notebook or a spiral-bound book or something and get a ball-point pen of your choice. And sure people say, “You’ve got to carry around a notebook and jot down ideas” and that is OK, and I adapted that by writing on a folded-up piece of paper and carry it around in my pocket – that’s one thing. But this is different; if you’re reading along and you come to something that’s really beautiful, that really stops you in the eye with its prose, you see it’s true, then I’ll stop or make a note to stop later and open the notebook and copy it out, in quotation marks, of course, and write down – copy that out word for word, with full punctuation, in handwriting. And the reason that’s useful is it slows you down and helps you understand the rhythm of the prose and how a person constructed something that opened up in your mind in just that way. So copying out in a commonplace book interesting bits of writing that you find inspiring or interesting is the only piece of advice I have. It’s the only secret that I have to pass on. I’m not a poet, but copy it out and you will be amazed at how much it helps you almost instantly. Instantly, it makes you a more thoughtful reader and possibly a better writer.”

Nicholson Baker’s best advice – a fine addition to the year’s best reads on writing. (via explore-blog)

Very compelling thought for me, and this would be a simple New Years resolution to make… I tumble, tweet, pin, and evernote so many quotations, and he is right ~ handwriting them is an entirely different experience, as is the revisiting of them in your notebook.

From the MWA Archives: Carry, and Use, Pen and Paper

(via explore-blog)


Nov 18
creativesomething:


Keep a notebook, if only for the sake of getting out of your own head once in a while.


Good advice.

creativesomething:

Keep a notebook, if only for the sake of getting out of your own head once in a while.

Good advice.


Oct 27

Oct 21
“If I dismiss the ordinary — waiting for the special, the extreme, the extraordinary to happen — I may just miss my life. […] To allow ourselves to spend afternoons watching dancers rehearse, or sit on a stone wall and watch the sunset, or spend the whole weekend rereading Chekhov stories—to know that we are doing what we’re supposed to be doing — is the deepest form of permission in our creative lives. The British author and psychologist Adam Phillips has noted, “When we are inspired, rather like when we are in love, we can feel both unintelligible to ourselves and most truly ourselves.” This is the feeling I think we all yearn for, a kind of hyperreal dream state. We read Emily Dickinson. We watch the dancers. We research a little known piece of history obsessively. We fall in love. We don’t know why, and yet these moments form the source from which all our words will spring.” Read this, your soul will thank you (via explore-blog)

(via creativesomething)


Oct 18

“Three things are in your head… all of [it] in your mind as a fabulous mulch and you have to bring it out.”

Ray Bradbury, interviewed by Sam Weller at the Paris Review  The quote as (via stoweboyd) in fuller context:

Three things are in your head: First, everything you have experienced from the day of your birth until right now. Every single second, every single hour, every single day. Then, how you reacted to those events in the minute of their happening, whether they were disastrous or joyful. Those are two things you have in your mind to give you material. Then, separate from the living experiences are all the art experiences you’ve had, the things you’ve learned from other writers, artists, poets, film directors, and composers.

So all of this is in your mind as a fabulous mulch and you have to bring it out. How do you do that? I did it by making lists of nouns and then asking, What does each noun mean? You can go and make up your own list right now and it would be different than mine. The night. The crickets. The train whistle. The basement. The attic. The tennis shoes. The fireworks. All these things are very personal. Then, when you get the list down, you begin to word-associate around it. You ask, Why did I put this word down? What does it mean to me? Why did I put this noun down and not some other word? Do this and you’re on your way to being a good writer.

You can’t write for other people. You can’t write for the left or the right, this religion or that religion, or this belief or that belief. You have to write the way you see things. I tell people, Make a list of ten things you hate and tear them down in a short story or poem. Make a list of ten things you love and celebrate them. When I wrote Fahrenheit 451 I hated book burners and I loved libraries. So there you are.

I like the description of what I normally think of as intuition + learning (and more precisely, Na‘auao) as “fabulous mulch.”

On a related tangent… In MWA culture-building, we kinda/sorta do the same thing, but with a focus on verbs: Next-stepping and other verbs.


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